Reappraisal of Property Damaged in Disaster Area - Section 23.02

Sec. 23.02. Reappraisal of Property Damaged in Disaster Area.

(a) The governing body of a taxing unit that is located partly or entirely inside an area declared to be a disaster area by the governor may authorize reappraisal of all property damaged in the disaster at its market value immediately after the disaster.

(b) If a taxing unit authorizes a reappraisal pursuant to this section, the appraisal office shall complete the reappraisal as soon as practicable. The appraisal office shall include on the appraisal records, in addition to other information required or authorized by law:

(1) the date of the disaster;

(2) the appraised value of the property after the disaster; and

(3) if the reappraisal is not authorized by all taxing units in which the property is located, an indication of the taxing units to which the reappraisal applies.

(c) A taxing unit that authorizes a reappraisal under this section must pay the appraisal district all the costs of making the reappraisal. If two or more taxing units provide for the reappraisal in the same territory, each shall share the costs of the reappraisal in that territory in the proportion the total dollar amount of taxes imposed in that territory in the preceding year bears to the total dollar amount of taxes all units providing for reappraisal of that territory imposed in the preceding year.

(d) If property damaged in a disaster is reappraised as provided by this section, the governing body shall provide for prorating the taxes on the property for the year in which the disaster occurred. If the taxes are prorated, taxes due on the property are determined as follows: the taxes on the property based on its value on January 1 of that year are multiplied by a fraction, the denominator of which is 365 and the numerator of which is the number of days before the date the disaster occurred; the taxes on the property based on its reappraised value are multiplied by a fraction, the denominator of which is 365 and the numerator of which is the number of days, including the date the disaster occurred, remaining in the year; and the total of the two amounts is the amount of taxes on the property for the year.

In: Commercial Property Tax News